Truro, Cathedral School Assembly Hall

Display panel

Entries in grey are not obtained from documentary evidence, but are inferred from content, context, etc.

Date of manufacture
Not known
Date of insertion
2017
Maker
Willimott, Revd William?
Main subject
Arms, emblems, etc.:
Truro Duchy of Cornwall
Revd Preb James Ford,
major donor to library
Viscount Portman,
Lord Warden of the Stannaries
Edward Benson
as bishop of Truro
Henry Phillpotts
as bishop of Exeter
Flowers and foliage
Notes
  1. Originally inserted in a window in Bishop Phillpotts’ Library, Truro. Moved to Diocesan House and then Week St Mary.
  2. Inserted in in a display panel in the former Assembly Hall of Truro Cathedral School.

Whole panel.

Upper left, inserted back-to-front, shown here in the correct orientation. The design used in the seal and arms of the City of Truro. The arms of the City of Truro are gules the base wavy argent and azure thereon a ship of three masts under sail all or, on each topmast a banner, on the waves in base two fishes of the second. (Burke, Bernard, The General Armory of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales, p 1033. , London, Harrison & Sons).

Upper row right. A design based on the arms of the Duchy of Cornwall, which are sable fifteen bezants, five, four, three, two and one. (Burke, Bernard, The General Armory of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales, p 230. , London, Harrison & Sons) and motto One and All.

Centre row left, inserted back-to-front, shown here in the correct orientation. The arms, crest and motto of Revd Preb James Ford, Prebendary of Exeter Cathedral , a major donor to the Bishop Phillpotts’ Library.

The arms of Revd Preb James Ford. The arms of his father’s family (Ford, lions rampant) are in the first and fourth quarters, his maternal grandfather (Booth, boars’ heads) in the second quarter, and his maternal grandmother (Salwey, saltire) in the fourth quarter. The arms of his wife’s father (Nagle, sword in bend) are in the first and fourth quarters of the escutcheon of pretence, and the arms of his wife’s mother (Beauchamp, vair) in the second and third quarters of the escutcheon.

The arms of Ford are azure three lions rampant crowned or and the crest of Ford is a demi-lion rampant crowned or (Burke , op. cit., p 366). The crescent for difference may signify that James Ford was the second son (of Sir Richard Ford, MP, chief police magistrate for London), or may signify the arms’ descent through a younger son in an earlier generation. The pseudo-Italian motto Que sera sera (Whatever will be will be) appears on the grave of Harriet Ford (Railroad Guide, from London to Birmingham, p 33, London, Joseph Thomas, ), the wife of James Ford’s older brother Richard, so is associated with this branch of the Ford family.

James Ford’s father, Richard Ford, married Marianne Booth, the daughter of Benjamin Booth, on (History of Parliament Online). Benjamin Booth married Jane Salwey, the daughter of Richard Salwey of Moor Park, Shropshire in (Wikipedia). The arms of Booth are argent three boars’ heads erect and erased sable langued gules (Burke , op. cit., p 100). The arms of Salwey are or, a saltire engrailed sable (Burke , op. cit., p 893).

James Ford married Jane Frances Nagle, the daughter of Edward Nagle, on (Oxford Journal p 3, University and Clerical Intelligence p 4, British Press p 4). Edward James Nagle married Anne Cranmer Beauchamp, the second daughter of John Beauchamp of Pengreep, Redruth, Cornwall on on (Kentish Weekly Post p 3, Kentish Gazette p 3). The arms of Nagle are ermine on a fess wavy azure cotised gules three mascles or, over all on a bend of the third a sword argent the hilt enriched with diamonds proper (Burke , op. cit., p 721). The arms of Beauchamp of Pengreep are vair (Burke , op. cit., p 62).

All the areas of the arms that should be azure (blue), viz., the field (background) of Ford, the fesse of Nagle and the vair of Beauchamp, are now an off-white pale grey, which is distinct from the argent of, for example the Booth field. This may be caused by degradation of the original blue paint or stain.

Centre row, centre, inserted back-to-front, shown here in the correct orientation. Probably the arms and crest of Edward Berkeley Portman, 1st Viscount Portman, Lord Warden of the Stannaries . The arms of Portman are or, a fleur-de-lys azure (in this panel, the field is azure and the fleur-de-lys appears now to be argent, so the colours may have been reversed), and the crest of Portman is a talbot sejant (a dog sitting) (Burke , op. cit., p 816).

Centre row, right, inserted back-to-front, shown here in the correct orientation. The arms of Edward Benson as Bishop of Truro: the arms of the Diocese of Truro (argent on a saltire gules a key in bend, wards upward, surmounted by a two-edged sword in bend sinister, hilt upwards or, in base a fleur-de-lis sable, the whole within a bordure of Cornwall, viz. sable, fifteen bezants, Burke , op. cit., p 1033) impaled with those of Edward White Benson (argent a quatrefoil between two trefoils slipped in bend sable between double cotises gules, Burke , op. cit., p 71)

Lower row, left, inserted back-to-front, shown here in the correct orientation. Arms of Henry Phillpotts as Bishop of Exeter. Arms of the Diocese of Exeter are gules two keys in saltire or, surmounted of a sword in pale proper (Burke, Bernard, The General Armory of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales, p 335. , London, Harrison & Sons) Arms of Phillpotts are gules a cross argent between four swords erect of the last, pommels and hilts or (Burke , op. cit., p 800.

Lower row, right, inserted back-to-front, shown here in the correct orientation. In the centre, a blue rose, surrounded by flowers and foliage, possibly including a fleur-de-lys at each corner.

The panels at Week St Mary, before moving to Truro Cathedral School.