St Merryn, St Merryn

Chancel east

Entries in grey are not obtained from documentary evidence, but are inferred from content, context, etc.

Date of manufacture and insertion
1934
Number of lights
4
Maker
Wippell, J (designed by George Cooper-Abbs)
Main subject
Illustration of the Te Deum Laudamus.
3a. The archangels Uriel and Michael 3b. Blessed Virgin Mary and infant Jesus 3c. Salvator Mundi . Alpha (Α) and Omega (Ω) symbols 3d. The archangels Gabriel and Raphael
2b. Crucifixion 2c. Resurrection: Christ arises from the grave
1a. The apostles Peter, John the Evangelist and Paul 1b. The prophets Malachi, John the Baptist and Isaiah 1c. The martyrs Agnes, Stephen and Alban. 1d. The saints Merryn, Francis of Assisi and Nicholas.
Tracery subject
B1. Heaven represented as a city. Angels playing long wind instruments.
A1, A2. Seraph, cherubim, angels playing long wind instruments
Donor
Emilie Twist, widow of dedicatee
Dedicatee
William Charles Twist, secretary of imports and exports company in London, died in accident at Treyarnon Bay, aged 57.
Notes
  1. Death of dedicatee, Cornish Guardian p 6.
  2. Maker’s mark and dated - George Cooper Abbs below Wippell rebus, , at the bottom left of 1d.
  3. Truro Diocesan Faculty petition dated , D/R/12/25 (Kresen Kernow), D/R/12/25 (National Archive), D/R/104/1–2, signed and dated drawing.
  4. Faculty granted for rebuilding portion of east-end wall, Cornish Guardian p 2.
  5. Insertion, donor, dedicatee, detailed description of subjects, Cornish Guardian p 11.
  6. Manufacturer, insertion, A directory of stained glass windows executed within the past twenty years , p 94. London, The British Society of Master Glass-Painters, , A directory of stained glass windows executed within the past twenty years , p 21. London, The British Society of Master Glass-Painters, .

We praise thee O God: we acknowledge thee to be the Lord. All the earth doth worship thee: the Father everlasting (the beginning of the Te Deum Laudamus, Book of Common Prayer, ).

B1. Heaven as a city with a variety of architectural styles and, in front, three angels playing long wind instruments.

Holy, Holy

A1. To thee Cherubin and Seraphin continually do cry, Holy, Holy, Holy (Te Deum, ibid). Seraph (with six wings) and cherubim (four wings) and an angel playing a long wind instrument in front of the wall of the city of Heaven.

Holy

A2. To thee Cherubin and Seraphin continually do cry, Holy, Holy, Holy (Te Deum, ibid). Seraph (with six wings) and cherubim (four wings) and an angel playing a long wind instrument in front of the wall of the city of Heaven.

3a. The archangels Uriel, holding symbols of the Sun and the Crescent Moon, and Michael wearing armour and holding a spear. A notice in the church beside the window identifies the archangels as Gabriel and Uriel whereas a contemporary report of the window’s insertion (note 5, above) identifies them as Uriel and Michael. The latter seems more likely, because Uriel is commonly associated with the sun and constellations, and Michael is commonly shown wearing armour. See also Jameson, Sacred and Legendary Art, Vol Ⅰ, p 52, , London, Spottiswoode and Shaw.

The Word was made flesh (John 1:14).

3b. The Blessed Virgin Mary and the infant Jesus.

3c. The Christus Rex, the reigning Christ (Christ in Majesty) and the Alpha and Omega (the beginning and the end).

3d. The archangels Gabriel, in Jewish tradition the guardian of the celestial treasury, shown holding a flaming sword, and Raphael, the protector of pilgrims, holding a staff and a fish. A notice in the church beside the window identifies the left-hand archangel as Michael, whereas a contemporary report of the window’s insertion (note 5, above) identifies him as Gabriel. The latter seems more likely, because Michael is probably the right-hand archangel shown in 3a. See also Jameson, Sacred and Legendary Art, ibid.

2b. The Crucifixion.

2c. The Resurrection.

1a. The glorious company of the Apostles (Te Deum, ibid). Three apostles: St Peter, holding the keys, St John the Evangelist, holding a chalice from which a dragon is emerging, and St Paul, holding a book and sword. At the bottom left is Truro Cathedral on a rock foundation.

1b. The goodly fellowship of the Prophets (Te Deum, ibid). Three prophets: Malachi prophesying the arrival of the Son of Righteousness, John the Baptist heralding the coming of Christ, and Isaiah holding a scroll on which is written Arise, shine, for thy light is come (Isaiah 60:1).

1c. The noble army of Martyrs (Te Deum, ibid). Three martyrs: St Agnes, carrying a lamb, St Stephen, carrying a stone and martyr’s palm frond and St Alban, the first British martyr.

1d. The holy Church throughout all the world (Te Deum, ibid). Three saints: St Marina (Merryn), with Celtic decoration around the bottom of her dress, St Francis of Assisi, showing the stigmata on his hands, and St Nicholas, dressed as bishop of Myra, with a ship at his feet. A notice in the church beside the window identifies the right-hand saint as St Patrick, whereas a contemporary report of the window’s insertion (note 5, above) identifies him as St Nicholas. St Nicholas seems more likely, because a ship is a common attribute of his, whereas St Patrick is usually shown dressed in green and his attribute is usually a snake. Also, to illustrate the holy Church throughout all the world (Merryn is Celtic, Francis of Assisi is Italian), a saint from Myra, now Demre in Turkey, would be more appropriate than a second Celtic saint.

GEORGE COOPER ABBS.

1d detail. The marks of George Cooper-Abbs and J Wippell & Co of Exeter, the designer and maker respectively of the window, at the bottom left of the panel near St Merryn’s right foot.

Drawing of the window, signed by its designer, George Cooper-Abbs, in the petition for the Faculty to erect the window.

The original drawing is in the custody of Kresen Kernow, reference D/R/104/1–2.